Apples

  • Ambrosia
  • Braeburn
  • Fuji
  • Golden Delicious
  • Granny Smith
  • Honeycrisp
  • Hyslop
  • Jonagold
  • McIntosh
  • Nicola
  • Pink Lady
  • Red Delicious
  • Royal Gala
  • Spartan
  • Sunrise
  • Ambrosia

    This apple is a homegrown original and we’re pretty proud of it around here. It was discovered by the Mennells (see Our Growers) in the 1990s as a chance seedling. No one really knows its parentage. But the original orchard was full of Jonagolds and had previously been home to both Golden Delicious and Red Delicious trees.

    Not only is this variety beautiful but it’s also versatile, making it a favourite in both lunchboxes and the pie dish. Crisp, sweet, and aromatic, it has a combination of red stripes over a creamy yellow background that produces an attractive pink blush.

    Usage: The flesh of Ambrosia apples is slow to turn brown, making them especially suited for eating on their own and in salads. They’re also great for use in pies and baking – in fact, you’ll need less sugar than usual because they’re so sweet.

    Availability: Harvested in late September, they’re available from late September to April or May.

  • Braeburn

    A New Zealand native, the Braeburn is an excellent keeping apple with a sweet yet tart flavour and firm, crisp, juicy flesh. Its shape is slightly oval, and its colouring is red on a green background.

    Usage: They’re superb apples for eating fresh or using in salads. Also excellent in pies and sauces.

    Availability: Harvested in early October, they’re available late October through March.

  • Fuji

    Originating in Japan, the Fuji is a cross between a Red Delicious and a lesser-known variety called Ralls Janet. It’s super sweet with firm, crisp flesh that gives you a satisfying crunch. And who doesn’t love a satisfying crunch? The Fuji has red stripes over a yellow-green background and it’s a big one – about the size of a softball.

    Usage: Fuji apples are excellent for eating on their own or in salads. They’re also great for baking and desserts because they hold their shape well. Naturally sweet, you’ll find you need less sugar.

    Availability: Harvested in mid October, they’re available late October through to May.

  • Golden Delicious

    The Golden Delicious apple is a beloved classic. And for good reason. This variety has a rich, unique flavour, a lovely golden colour, and medium-firm flesh. Some call it one of the finest salad and dessert apples ever grown. (We can’t take sides on this issue, as all the other apples will get jealous.) Originally found as a chance seedling on a farm in West Virginia in 1905, the Golden Delicious has gone on to be a favourite around the world.

    Usage: Golden Delicious apples are great for eating on their own or in salads, but they’re also perfect for pies, sauces and for baking. Naturally sweet, you’ll find you need less sugar.

    Availability: Harvested in mid September, they’re available from late September to June.

  • Granny Smith

    Tangy, tart and oh-so tasty, Granny Smith apples are a gorgeous colour of green. They have a slighter harder texture and are just a little less sweet than other apples. Starting as a chance seedling in Australia in 1868, they’re thought to have been a hybrid of the European Wild Apple and a domestic apple.

    Usage: Granny Smiths are great for eating on their own and in salads as the flesh doesn’t turn brown as quickly as some other varieties. While a raw Granny Smith is tart and tangy, once baked they’re much sweeter – which makes them ideal for cooking.

    Availability: Harvested in early October, they’re available from late October through to May.

  • Honeycrisp

    The Honeycrisp earned its name from being sweet as honey and extraordinarily crisp. A cross between Macoun and Honey Gold, Honeycrisps are jumbo sized, with mostly red colouring over a yellow background.

    Usage: Honeycrisp apples are excellent for eating on their own, in salads, sauces, and baking.

    Availability: Harvested in early September, they’re available October through December.

  • Hyslop

    This large crab apple of unknown origin was first recorded in 1869. It has dark red skin with purple overtones and is sometimes spelled Hislop.

    Usage: Hyslops have a tangy, astringent flavour, perfect for making jelly, pickling or baking spiced crab apples.

    Availability: Harvested in late July, they’re available September through June.

  • Jonagold

    Large in size – and in fabulousness – Jonagold are a cross between Golden Delicious and Jonathan apples. They are firm, crisp, crunchy and sweet.

    Usage: Great for just eating or adding to salads, these apples cook firm and also make scrumptious pies.

    Availability: Harvested in late September, they’re available October through March.

  • McIntosh

    Back in 1811 John McIntosh stumbled across a chance seedling in his orchard. He transplanted it. It flourished. And thus his name was immortalized as a favourite tree fruit. Often shortened to Mac, these firm, crispy apples have a greenish overtone with a distinctive red “cheek.” They boast a rich, tangy flavour, an alluring aroma and their small to medium size makes them lunchbox perfect.

    Usage: McIntosh apples are great for eating on their own, adding to salads, or cooking in pies, but they’re really well known for the pink-tinted applesauce that they make. (Note: if you’re using them in pies, you’ll need to use a thickener.)

    Availability: Harvested in late August, they’re available from September through to May.

  • Nicola

    With nearly 8,000 apple varieties in the world, you’d think people would be blasé about yet one more. But that’s not the case with the Nicola. Large, sweet and crisp, with a taste profile as refined as its name, the Nicola is already a favourite among foodies.

    Cultivated locally using natural methods, it’s distinctive for its cherry red blush over a greenish yellow background as well as for its long, elegant, and highly flexible stem. It also boasts an outstanding shelf life: up to five months without losing texture or juiciness.

    Usage: The Nicola apple is a fantastic eating apple, yet also exquisite in salads, sauces and pies.

    Availability: January through late Spring.

  • Pink Lady

     Availability: November to January

  • Red Delicious

    When you think of an apple, this is the one that probably pops into your head. The Red Delicious is officially classed as a “sweet" apple, but it also has a certain pleasing tartness. Its flesh is highly flavoured, crisp and juicy when eaten raw. The variety started as a chance seedling in Iowa in the 1880s and is especially popular in North America.

    Usage: Red Delicious apples are best eaten on their own, in a salad or used raw in other dishes.

    Availability: Harvested in late September, they’re available from October through to July.

  • Royal Gala

    Yes, it would seem even apples have royalty. Presenting the Royal Gala – a crisp, firm, bright red or orange patterned fruit with a yellow background. Small to medium sized with a thinner skin, this sweet, succulent apple is a cross between a Golden Delicious and Kidd’s Orange Red. Originating in New Zealand in the 1920s, it’s a favourite around the world.

    Usage: Royal Galas are best eaten on their own or in a salad. But they’re also good for pies, baking and sauces.

    Availability: Harvested in late August, they’re available from September through to May.

  • Spartan

    The Spartan apple was the first new breed of apple created by the Pacific Agri-food Research Centre in Summerland. So let’s give it up to the Okanagan once again for bringing the world a fabulous tree fruit. A little smaller, with snowy-white flesh and dark red skin, these crunchy, sweet apples are great in lunch boxes. And in briefcases. And in purses. And…well, you get the idea.

    Usage: Spartans are excellent all-purpose apples, perfect for eating on their own or in salads, pies and sauces.

    Availability: Harvested in late September, they’re available from October through to July.

  • Sunrise

    The perfect blend of sweet and tart, Sunrise apples are one of the first varieties to be harvested each year. That’s why many people refer to them as “summer apples.” The Sunrise rose out of the Okanagan valley, being yet another delectable tree fruit from the Pacific Agri-food Research Centre in Summerland.

    Usage: Sunrise apples are excellent all-purpose apples, perfect for eating on their own or for use in pies, baking and sauces.

    Availability: Harvested in early August, they’re available from August through to September.